Accommodations

Screen Magnification/Reader Software

Screen Magnification/Reader Software

Learn how screen magnification software can assist individuals with low vision. Visit us online at http://cap.mil/
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How Can I Find a Good Amplified Stethoscope to Hear Soft Sounds

How Can I Find a Good Amplified Stethoscope to Hear Soft Sounds?

As you probably know, there are many different types of stethoscopes available to student and health professionals. Sometimes it takes trial and error to find the right one, so it may be worthwhile to order a few and check the return policy so the ones that don’t work as well can be returned.

The best source of information on the various stethoscopes can be found at
AMPHL Stethoscope Information. Here you will find articles on stethoscopes as well as the various features available. Some work with hearing aids, some with cochlear implants, etc. These websites have additional information on “The Best Amplified Stethoscope for Hard of Hearing Medical Professionals” and “Technical Considerations in Using Stethoscopes

AMPHL Forums
AMPHL (Association of Medical Professionals With Hearing Losses) provides information, promotes advocacy and mentorship, and creates a network for individuals with hearing loss interested in or working in health care fields.

If you have specific questions, join the
AMPHL forums and ask other healthcare professionals with hearing loss what they have used and what works and does not work for them. 

What if I Need Assistance with Personal Needs when I am at School or Work in the Clinical Setting?

What if I Need Assistance with Personal Needs when I am at School or Work in the Clinical Setting?

This may be a personal assistant issue and not your school’s or employer's responsibility.

Below are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:




Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

As a Nurse or Nursing Student Using a Wheelchair, How Can I Perform a "Head-to-Toe" Physical Exam?

As a Nurse or Nursing Student Using a Wheelchair, How Can I Perform a "Head-to-Toe" Physical Exam?

You also may ask your patient to sit in a chair or non-rolling stool for part of the exam, lower the table or bed so that you can reach your patient more easily. Remember that many nurses complete the exam on the patient’s front side first, progressing to the back, which would require you to reposition yourself less frequently.

See how one nursing student using a wheelchair adapted to situations like this in the film entitled
Open the Door, Get 'Em a Locker. In addition, here are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:

If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Care for Patients with Contact Precautions?
If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Complete a Student Rotation in the Operating Suite?



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

Can I Be a Nurse if I Have Concerns with Manual Dexterity or Have only One Hand?

Can I Be a Nurse if I Have Concerns with Manual Dexterity or Have One Hand?

Absolutely! NOND has contact with nurses who have practiced as a nurse with one hand for over 25 years. Use the resources below and work with your college’s or university’s Disability Services Officer to request accommodations. Be creative when designing accommodations - as long as certain principles are followed, the ways in which tasks are done may become negotiable. With respect to technical tasks, there may be more than one way to do them. If you need specific suggestions, contact NOND to speak with one of our experts. See Danielle’s story, a successful nurse in practice.

Please explore our website for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and work. For assistance with the ADA, contact the Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance Centers. Learning about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 will help you to understand how the ADAAA broadens coverage for many individuals.

For protection, advocacy, and legal assistance, contact your state
National Disability Rights Network. Be sure to click on your state so that you get relevant and timely information. Also check out your rights under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

For connections with people with disabilities in your community, contact your local
Center for Independent Living.

Some nursing programs may be more receptive to you than others. If you have the opportunity, talk to current students or to nursing faculty about a selected program’s record of accommodating students with disabilities. Also, meet with the Disability Services Officer to discuss entrance requirements and your expected access to accommodations.



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

How Can I Master Clinical Skills if I Have Impaired Vision?

How Can I Master Clinical Skills if I Have Impaired Vision?

Please explore our website for resources in regard to
education, advocacy, and work. You may already know about national organizations providing assistance for people with impaired vision nfb.org/state-and-local-organizations and “Shedding Light on Nurses with Vision Loss.”

The ADA Amendments specify that mitigating measures or devices such as special eye wear cannot be considered in determining whether a person has an impairment that substantially limits a major life activity (the criterion for protection under the ADA). This means that your bioptics (described below) or other special adaptations that help you function well do not disqualify you for protection under the ADA. In addition, here are some specific suggestions from our Board members about how you might adapt to the clinical setting:

  • Use a clip-on magnifier for hands-free magnification or hand magnifiers.
  • Use lenses such as those used by surgeons or a bioptic, which work like binoculars. You can zoom in or out until you can see the object. A specialist in low vision optometry can prescribe these special binocular glasses.
  • Review different low vision websites for instruments to test out in the learning laboratory with your instructor. You may need different items for different tasks; make sure you can return the ones that do not work for you.
  • Use a headband light. Extra light is extremely important in accomplishing clinical tasks; fluorescent lights are problematic for people with low vision.
  • Use a talking blood pressure device and talking thermometer.
  • For charting on paper: A hand-held magnification device from Telesensory utilizes a computer screen where the size of the object/print can be enlarged.
  • For computer charting: Screen magnifiers (programs added to agency mainframes or a pen drive that can be taken from computer to computer) work wonders for anyone with low vision. Zoomtext is one of the available assistive technology software programs but there are many companies that sell these products.
  • For catheterizing: A headband light can help you view the area for catheter insertion a little better. Get closer than other nurses to the patient, while making sure to maintain the sterile field. Extra light and closer proximity to the patient are the keys to this procedure. 
  • For tracheotomy care: Extra light and magnification glasses or clip-ons will help. With gloved hands, place one index finger alongside the tracheotomy so that you can feel the opening. Use that finger as a guide to insert the suction tube into the trach. Because you will get closer than other nurses (while still maintaining your sterile field), you may want to wear a mask. This may take a little practice but it works.
  • For IV medication administration: Again, the key is getting close and having adequate light. You can use magnifier glasses to make the very small print larger and a headband light to view the small connections for the tubing. 

Other resources for you include the following:




Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

What Jobs in Nursing Can I do if I Have Physical Limitations?

What Jobs in Nursing Can I do if I Have Physical Limitations?

Please explore our website for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and work.

For information about how to get a job or get through school, contact your
State Vocational Rehabilitation Program. and Job Accommodation Network. There are more and more nursing jobs for people with physical limitations. Here are some suggestions:

  • Legal consultation (training is available on-line)
  • Lactation consultant
  • Occupational health
  • Psychiatric or mental health nursing
  • Case management
  • Triage at a home care agency
  • Quality assurance reviews
  • Chart reviews for a nursing home
  • Drug reviews or physical exams for insurance companies
  • On-line teaching for masters or doctorally-prepared nursing faculty
  • Protocol reviews for research projects
  • If you want part-time, interview only for part time or find another nurse who can share the job with you.
  • While you are looking for a job:
  • Do not let your license lapse. You cannot practice without a renewal, which generally involves taking a refresher course requiring clinical hours.
  • Keep up with your continuing education credits (CEUs) if required by your State Board of Nursing.
  • Think about going on for an advanced degree so that you may teach part time at a community college or in a CNA course.

For protection, advocacy, and legal assistance, contact your state National Disability Rights Network. Be sure to click on your state so that you get relevant and timely information. For assistance with the ADA, contact the Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance Centers. Learning about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 will help you to understand how the ADAAA broadens coverage for many individuals.



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

If my school allows me to repeat an exam because I did not receive adequate accommodations for a learning disability, does this set a precedent so that all other students must get the same consideration?

If my school allows me to repeat an exam because I did not receive adequate accommodations for a learning disability, does this set a precedent so that all other students must get the same consideration?

Explore our website for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and work.

For protection, advocacy, and legal assistance, contact your state
National Disability Rights Network. Be sure to click on your state so that you get relevant and timely information. For assistance with the ADA, contact the Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance Centers. Learning about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 will help you to understand how the ADAAA broadens coverage for many individuals. Yes, the ADA Amendments cover major life activities that can be limited by learning disabilities (for example, learning and concentrating) and provide protection for you.

Support and Activism
For connections with people with disabilities in your community, contact your local
Center for Independent Living. Also, contact your local adapt organization to learn about activism.

Under the ADA, qualified students with disabilities are dealt with on individual basis. If an appropriate accommodation is for you to retake an exam, that does not set a precedent or mean that the option has to be offered to all other students.

If there are no clear procedures for requesting accommodations, you have grounds to complain to the school administration and to the
Office for Civil rights (OCR), if you so choose. If there are clearly stated procedures for requesting services and you followed them, but were not given appropriate support, then you can appeal that decision both internally and externally, again, through the Office for Civil rights (OCR).

If you did not follow the stated procedures, then you are on less solid ground. Even so, if you repeatedly asked for help from your faculty for a learning disability, they should have referred you back to the Disability Services office at your campus to for support and formal accommodations.



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

What Happens if My Request for Accommodation is Denied?

What Happens if My Request for Accommodation is Denied?

Please explore our website for resources in regard to
education, advocacy, and work. For protection, advocacy, and legal assistance, contact your state National Disability Rights Network. Be sure to click on your state so that you get relevant and timely information.

For assistance with the ADA, contact the
Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance Centers. Learning about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 will help you to understand how the ADAAA broadens coverage for many individuals.

Support and Activism
For connections with people with disabilities in your community, contact your local
Center for Independent Living.



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

How Can I Access Accommodations For My Disability?

How Can I Access Accommodations For My Disability?

Please explore our website for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and work. Also, the story of one nursing student’s accommodations in a baccalaureate nursing program may be of interest to you: Open the Door, Get 'Em a Locker. In addition, you also need to access your agency or university policies concerning disabilities; this may be found on their website.


You do not have to disclose your disability to anyone but if you seek accommodations, you must disclose to the Disability Services Officer at your agency or university. Documentation from a health care professional about the nature of your disability may be required. If you are a student, you will work with the Disability Services Officer and nursing faculty to determine relevant accommodations to meet your learning needs. During this process, the accommodations selected must not impose undue hardship on the nursing program or compromise its integrity.

You may also want to contact these resources, according to your specific needs:




Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

What Do I Do if I Have Test Anxiety?

What Do I Do if I Have Test Anxiety?

Remember that you must document your disability with your school’s Disability Services Office in order to receive accommodations. You will work with the Disability Services Office and faculty to identify helpful accommodations such as additional time or a separate test-taking environment. The American with Disabilities Act is designed to support individual variation; every case is different in the area of accommodations – you must find what works for you.

Our
website can give you more information on ways to advocate for yourself. Also, learning more about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 and how coverage has been broadened for many individuals will help your self-advocacy skills.



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

Can I Use a Calculator in Clinical Practice

I Have Dyscalculia: Can I Use a Calculator in School and in Clinical Practice?
by Robin Jones, Director, Great Lakes ADA Center
www.adagreatlakes.org

I think that you have to go back to the analysis of what is being asked: Use of a calculator
What is the question:  Does the use of a calculator create a fundamental alteration in the program or service.  
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